2019.8

Griggs wins nail-biter at Bombala bowls tournament: Photos

Griggs wins nail-biter at Bombala bowls tournament: Photos The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.
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The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.

The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.

The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.

The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.

The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.

The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.

The final of the handicap singles championships on Saturday saw G Griggs def P Jones, 23-20. While some players managed to get in some games in Bombala, the tournament in Ulladulla was a wash-out.

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Artyculture record broken

TROPICAL: Chloe Sharpe designed and modelled the dress that her grandmother Joy Crosby made. It won the adult section.
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PRETTY: Megan Grainger modelled teen winner Amy Flavell s design.

CREATIVE: Georgina Gaston modelled incentive winner Therese Flavell s design.

BRIGHT: Jasmin Piggott modelled Beth Hammond s design, which was equal people s choice winner.

CUTE: Bree Alcock won the children s section.

AMAZING: Kate Grainger won the people’s choice and the best accessorised dress in the Artyculture parade. Her dress weighed about 25 kilograms.

THIS year’s Artyculture parade at the Eyre Peninsula Field Days broke participation records from previous parades.

“It was wonderful, we had more models than we have ever had before,” one of the organisers Maureen Johnson said.

Along with more models, Mrs Johnson said there were also a record number of 26 entries in this year’s parade.

“That is mainly because of the Cleve Area School’s involvement in the parade this year.”

Mrs Johnson said the Eyre Peninsula Field Days pavilion where the parade was held was packed every day and there were a number of people who put in a lot of work.

“There are so many people who work behind the scenes of the parade,” Mrs Johnson said.

“Jasmin Piggott did a wonderful job with the choreography and Jo Sampson just has to be thanked for all of her hard work and for being the compere.”

“Nathan Rosenzweig did all of the music, Tina Rosenzweig was our main dresser and Sue-Anne Marino did a wonderful job with makeup.”

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Andamooka and Hornridge remember Troy Gum with memorial trophy

RESPECT: Players from both Hornridge and Andamooka had a minute s silence for the Troy Gum Memorial Trophy match.
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Andamooka and Hornridge remembered the passing of friend and teammate Troy Gum with one minute’s silence before clashing in the Troy Gum Memorial Trophy match.

The game, now an annual tradition, pays a homage to a man tragically taken by cancer two years ago.

Troy grew up in Roxby playing football for Hornridge and was affiliated through friendship with the Andamooka football team.

The game as the french say was “a fait accompli”.

I suppose that is a fancy way of saying “yep, knew Andamooka were going to get their backside’s kicked”.

The 1.4-10 to 20.12-132 final score, however, doesn’t reflect the courage shown by the Andamooka boys despite the shellacking.

Kangaroos coach Craig Whyatt reflected on a season that demonstrated Andamooka’s inability to match it with the rest of the league, yet was pleased that under the circumstances his team had the courage to duke it out irrespective of the what the scoreboard was telling them.

While most teams had their fair share of injuries and absent players, arguably Andamooka suffered the most.

So for Whyatt and his band of brothers it’s the end of a forgettable season.

Hornridge on the other hand are major contenders in this year’s finals, however, while they might of got some match practice in against the hapless ‘Roos, they cannot afford to bask too long, if at all, in Saturday’s victory.

When the game is broken down, Andamooka kept a much stronger and aggressive Magpies to four goals in the first quarter and in the third the ‘Roos clipped a flatfooted Magpie run by only conceding four goals.

The truth of it is the ‘Pies should have slotted at least another four or six plus, against a Kangaroos side that had little or no run off the bench and inferior football skills.

The point is, Hornridge cannot afford to stray off the path and must play four quarters of consistent football.

If they are stalled by a depleted team such as Andamooka, imagine what a well oiled Roxby Districts, an unpredictable Olympic Dam, or if Coober Pedy manage to present its best side, will do to them if they stray too far from coach Mitchell’s plan.

DODGE: Hornridge’s Clayton Millard dodges defenders during his side’s win on Saturday.


Wymer: disaster funding for repairs not capital works

After the devastating floods of December 2010 and March 2012 across NSW, Young Shire Council pocketed $4.2 million in funding assistance under the Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements.
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This amount of cash may sound like a windfall, but it could only be spent on repairing damage caused by the floods and heavy rainfall, Young Shire Council director of operations Dirk Wymer said,

“The fundamental principal of natural disaster funding is to repair… not to complete capital works,” he said.

“Under the program, council is eligible to have the costs of repairing identified damage reimbursed.”

Mr Wymer said the funding totaled $950,000 for 2013/14, including $450,000 to assist with gravel road repair, and the remainder on sealed road projects.

“Council will be carrying out the final inspections on the program with the RMS staff,” he said.

Although Mr Wymer couldn’t give a figure to how many complaints the shire receives on the rural roads, he said council faced major obstacles to funding road upgrades and maintenance.

This, he said, was not a problem unique to Young.

“The Local Government Infrastructure Audit June 2013 in which the total infrastructure backlog for all NSW councils was estimated to be $7.4 billion at 30 June 2012, of which $4.5 billion relates to roads and related assets and $1 billion relates to buildings. The infrastructure backlog is over $1000 per head of the NSW population,” Mr Wymer said.

“Another of the challenges facing not only Young Shire but local government is the resilience of the road pavements. Thin flexible pavements have not been designed for the increasing volumes and weight of road freight traffic and a period of extended rainfall can result in lots of damage to the network.”

And cuts to the indexation of council’s federal assistance grants, set to come into effect this week, will put a further squeeze on council’s funding.

Mr Wymer said the expected shortfall of $475,000 in roads funding could set council’s works projects back by up to a year.

But Mr Wymer denied a resident’s claim a council grader and roller sat inactive on the side of the road for weeks.

“I don’t believe a claim of a grader sitting idle for eight weeks could be justified given council is given regular reports on the works program and also regular reports on plant utilisation,” he said.

Looking to the future, Mr Wymer said council was planning for the ongoing improvement of roads.

These plans include the reconstruction of the urban heavy vehicle routes through town, an application to participate in the Local Infrastructure Renewal Scheme, plans to widen the shoulder on Murringo and Milvale Roads, planned gravel roads reconstruction and resheeting and bitumen sealing some of the local gravel roads carrying higher traffic volumes.

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Snakes charm Penrith’s future scientists

New friend: Penrith South Public School year 6 pupil Lanu Cross-Taateo, 11, and year 4 pupil Lucas Golovchenko, 10, handle a python at an excursion to the University of Western Sydney’s Hawkesbury campus. Picture: Gene RamirezPenrith South Public School pupils scaled new heights of learning during a visit to the University of Western Sydney’s Hawkesbury campus for National Science Week.
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The year 6 pupils and 12 technology club members in years 3-6 handled pythons, lizards and other reptiles, discussed climate change, and made short movies with iPads to record their thoughts on their environment.

Year 4 pupil and reptile aficionado Lucas Golovchenko, 10, said he learned the children’s python was named after the English scientist who discovered it and that lizards were less easily agitated than snakes.

“The best part about today was getting to know facts more strongly,” he said.

“Holding the lizards and snakes was a good inspiration as well.

“Blue-tongue lizards are actually really gentle creatures.

“If you are going to get close to one you should be gentle and treat it how you would want to be treated.”

Year 6 pupil Jaylen Maipi, 11, said the climate talk focused on how much water animals and crops need and how to conserve water.

Classmate Lanu Cross-Taateo, 11, said the advice included not wasting water during shower times.

“They say if you just want to go for a shower to wash your body you should only go in for four or five minutes,” she said.

The UWS Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment’s communications manager David Thompson said it was the first time the university had offered the program to engage students in natural heritage and environment topics through technology.

“We’re hoping that it will reinforce their curiosity and their interest in all things environmental,” he said.

“By getting the students to record the small movies and document their own experiences the idea is to engage them in thinking about the science of our natural environment.”

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